History of Hernia Repair

You may think that hernia repair surgery is a relatively recent concept. And why not? Many people may view hernias as minor, insignificant problems. However, hernias can develop into serious, potentially life-threatening issues if left on checked. For centuries, people have been aware of just how dangerous a hernia can really be. Since ancient times, surgeons have been doing the best they can to correct this comment issue. Today, we have advanced techniques that allow safe and effective treatment with minimal recovery time. That has not always been the case, as we will consider.

The First Hernia Surgery

Ancient records of hernia surgery can date all the way back to ancient Egypt. Of course, there was minimal understanding of many of the concepts required to effectively perform any kind of surgery. Don’t even still, ancient Egyptians were able to understand the very basic information about hernias. For example, Even back then they understood that hernias could present a significant risk. They also understood many of the symptoms and potential causes for them. Just think! Long before computers, x-rays, and precision tools designed with the specific intent of performing surgery people wear attempting to correct such a serious issue. How effective were they? As you might expect, they were nowhere near as effective then as we are today. Due to the lack of evaluative and diagnostic understanding, many surgeries were performed in a sort of “trial and error” method. This included removing large sections of intestinal tissue, massive bloodletting to reduce the size of the hernia, and removing surrounding tissues. Some of these showed minimal results at best, leading many to dismiss the thought of treating hernias.

Technological and Medical Advancements

As time went on, more and more discoveries about anatomy and microbiology were developed that benefited the progress of hernia treatment. For example, the development of anesthetics allowed for a significant reduction in pain and therefore a more tolerable surgical experience. A growing understanding of antiseptic and hygiene techniques allowed for a much higher rate of recovery and greatly lower the risk of infection after surgery. In addition, further anatomical discoveries were constantly being made. This led to a better understanding of what exactly makes up a hernia, allowing for more effective and focused treatments. By the early 19th century, hernia surgeries were still being attempted with little to no success. This was all soon to change.

Landmark Developments

Has further medical understanding was refined, more effective treatment for a number of conditions with found. One primary development was with the implementation of prosthetic instruments. Originally, metal mesh sheets were implanted into the herniated region in order to prevent further herniation or relapse. This technique continues to be used today. Regular improvement on the materials, design, and placement of these mesh sheets continues to be made to this day. Also essential to hernia repair has been the greater use of the appropriate surgical procedures. For example, better laparoscopic techniques for entering the affected region and more effective sutures have made for better recovery times and less risk of complication. It is to be expected that constant improvement and development will be made to the surgical procedures. Advanced techniques, such as using robotic arms or lasers for increased precession, are just around the corner. We can be sure, regardless of what comes next, that the already effective and safe surgery involved in hernia repair will only get better!

Are you in need of the most up-to-date an advanced hernia surgery available today? Talk to the best surgeons in NYC to get your surgery scheduled.

Lenox Hill Surgeons, LLP
155 East 76th Street
Suite 1C
New York, NY 10021

646-846-1136

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References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19140492
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14586774
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/article-abstract/212807

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